About your Search

20100901
20100930
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7
. it is unheard of in great britain or canada for any party to ever think about changing the law to keep its competition off the bell. and the britain anyone can get on about -- to keep them off the ballot in this country. in canada but it only takes 100 signatures. it does not occur to people in most countries that is legitimate for two parties to get together and keep competition off the ballot. host: for those who tried to keep the parties off the ballots, what is the main reasoning? guest: it depends on whether they are talking honestly or not. if you want an example of an honest comment, i was at a georgia state legislative hearing once and a legislator on the elections committee said, i don't want no damn libertarian running against me. i appreciated that. when the law came before judges, the judges will not say something like that. they constantly tell us we are in danger of overcrowded ballots that will cause the uer confusion. the truth is, we suffer from under-crowded ballots. i have been tracking state legislative candidacies for 20 years. every election year between 30% and 35% o
and e.u. on exchange of information. we work very closely with canada and mexico, our two neighbors. and so there is a huge amount of interaction at the international level but all designed to minimize the risk that a terrorist could either enter the united states or be plotting somewhere else to injure u.s. interests. >> senator mueller. >> senator, we've realized for a number of years, certainly before my time, that our success is in large part dependent on working with our counterparts overseas. we have over 60 legal offices in embassies around the world which we use as liaisons to our counterparts. we have since the 1970's a national academy in which we've brought in state and local law enforcement for a 10-week period for training. we have for many years included our foreign counterparts, whether it be from iraq or pakistan or afghanistan as part of those classes in an effort to educate persons as to what the f.b.i. does but also how the f.b.i. does it and what we do not do. in those relatively small ways but i think important ways we have developed persons that provide the rel
neighbors to the north, canada, those kinds of systems work less well. it is very hard for us to go to a sovereign nation and say abide by this cap we might do it with canada. we will never do it with mexico and we will not do it with places like china. please comment on recycling, when and how does it work and not work. what does it cost? we have fortunately heard this afternoon from the trash me man, my colleague van benjamin, who published a work on the myths of recycling. i will do my best to summarize him in very few words. when does it work? not very often. how does it work? not very well. what does it cost? a lot. pretty well summarizes everything there is to know about recycling. it works when -- back to my concluding remarks -- it works when it is profitable. so aluminum works pretty well because in fact it makes economic sense. how does it work? with private incentives of people saying, hey, it is worth something to me to recycle my aluminum cans. it does not work when we end up spending far more -- and i do not mean just in the more money because money is just a way of me
at the general assembly held this fall in montreal, canada, where we hope to make our work towards strengthening international standards into an actual resolution of the international community through acio. i think it is also important to note that in addition to a.c.i.o. the airline industry's have been with us every step of the way. and we have collaborated closely with united states and international airline and trade associations. we have met with airline ceos. we have met with them shortly after christmas day to explain what security enhancements needed to go in place immediately, but what we were striving for in the following weeks. and i personally met with all of these leaders, and i have also met with heads of the international air travel association, and also sethe a.t.a., and they have voiced strong support for the international voice that we have begun and expressed, we hope, at this fall at the general assembly. i think it's true that it is clear that our potential for collaboration goes beyond counter-terrorism. the airline industry is the first line of defense against criminals o
in 1996. in fact the european union and others, including canada, australia, norway, japan and south korea have now imposed their own sanctions. virtually every western energy company has now agreed to cease sales of refined petroleum to iran and refrain from investments in iran's energy sector. following the passage, most banks in the united arab emirates, an portrayeding partner, stopped money transfers to iran. press reports have indicated sanctions have cut in half exports with dubai. south korean sanctions have suspended the iran bank in seoul. the bank is a known facilitator of iran's proliferation activities and south korea is iran's fourth largest trading parter. the impact is significant. based on our discussion with the korean government. the banks's operations have been shut down for good. japan have recently announced sanctions that target iranian entities and individuals of proliferation concern, including iranian banks, the islamic revolutionary guard corps and the iranian shipping lines. these sanctions, along with the prohibition on the transfer of proliferation-sensitive d
the way over there to canada and france, and that green line, that's the united states. we're second only to japan in terms of corporate tax rates. now, it's pretty hard for me to see the logic of complaining about things being made overseas, when what we do with our tax policy is tax corporations so heavily that you create an incentive to chase production overseas. if you're a businessman, you're competing. you're competing with all these other countries and what you're going to have to do is be competitive or else people won't by your product. so for us in congress to complain about foreign imports and things, when we've got a corporate tax rate that's second highest in the world, is once again an example of democrat tax policy being completely at odds with the goal of a strong economy and lots of jobs. you can't keep taxing the creator of jobs without losing your jobs. i think it's straightforward. i'm trying to make it simple. because there's one example after the other that our policies just don't make sense. here's a chart that's done a little more colorful way, we compete with fran
of their american parent for their entire childhood. canada, the united kingdom, have all asked japan on returning their abducted children. children japan's inaction on the issue is a thorn in the side of their relations with the entire international community. japan's current inaction violates their duties under the international covet on civil and political rights, article 23, to completely and unjustly ignore the equal rights of one parent. h.res. 1326 calls on japan to immediately and urgently establish a process for the resolution of abduction an wrongful retention of american children. japan must find the will to establish today a process that will justify and equitablely end the cruel separation currently endured by parent and children alike. h.res. 1326 also calls on japan to join the hague convention on the civil aspects of international child abduction. this convention sets out the international norms for resolution of abduction and wrongful retention cases and will create a framework to quickly resolve future cases and act as a deterrent to parents who now feel that they can abduct thei
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)